Mum Was Told She’d Never Have Kids, Gave Birth Baby Born 22 Weeks Defies The Odds To sᴜʀᴠɪᴠᴇ

Mum Was Told She’d Never Have Kids, Gave Birth Baby Born 22 Weeks Defies The Odds To Suvive 

Helen had (PCOS), a common condition that can cause pregnant.  (PCOS) is a common health condition that affects 8-13% of women of reproductive age. It is more common in some high-risk groups, such as Indigenous women.
Helen said: “I was told years ago that I would probably have an early menopause  and i couldn’t have my children , so Austin has been a little miracle from the very beginning. He is a miracle twice over. When I detected i was pregnant, I was ecstatic. I love him so much and I’m so grateful for all the care he’s had, spent all my time to him, carefully and gentle  “

     Austin Douglas was born with just 1lb 4oz  at 22 weeks – 18 weeks early – and measured smaller than his mum’s hand . When he was born at just 22 weeks, doctors said his parents that, he little chance of alive
Tiny Austin Douglas was born with  1lb 4oz, the same as a bag  ᴏf salt , when he was born 18 weeks early. He was smaller than his mum’s hand. It was hard to cuddled . And his skin was so thin his organs  were visible, while the holes in his ears had yet to complete. Mum Helen, 30, and dad Rhys, 25, prepared themselves for the sad things, even couldn’t keept their child.

Twenty four weeks is, by law, the legal limit of viability.
And guidance from the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists states babies born before this time pose a “major medical and ethical challenge”.But, gold bless following weeks of specialist care at Birmingham Children’s Hospital, the brave newborn is now recovering well and is set to go home on his original due date. Helen said her son is a “miracle twice over”, after she was previously doctors said she would never be able to have kids.

Helen was rushed to Leicester General Hospital when she had signs of labour  just over half way through her pregnancy. Doctors told her she was fully dilated and there was nothing to do to stop the birth.

She added: “His ears hadn’t fully developed and neither had his lungs. The medical staff whisked him away and put him in an incubator while they worked on him beside my bed. It was but I knew he needed intervention.”
Tiny Austin was need straight into an incubator before being taken to Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, where he was taken care  of for seven weeks. Doctors said his life would become better  in some weeks later.


His proud parents are determined to bring their newborn home on July 28, his original due date, as he continues to face against the odds.
She added: “He has grown a lot, I can hold him with two hands now and he is bigger than my husband’s hand. His heart beat is strong and breathing on his own gets better and longer every day.He did it well done.

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