Lost Kingdom Revealed: Rediscovering ‘Atlantis’ on Medieval Maps

Throughout the centuries, rumors have circulated about an ancient kingdom called Cantre’r Gwaelod that once existed in the Cardigan Bay of Wales. Legend has it that this land was submerged beneath the waves, becoming a mythical “Welsh Atlantis,” shrouded in mystery.The great success of the country "Atlantis" on the board by Chinese shuttlecock

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The stories of the kingdom of Cantre’r Gwaelod have changed over the years. Many say a young woman was negligent in preventing a well from overflowing the land, while others blamed a drunken janitor for not overseeing the dikes and drowning the kingdom.

 

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Legend has it that the kingdom’s church bells that have been sunk can still be heard on quiet evenings. Recently, two researchers have presented new evidence that two islands once existed in the bay, based on analysis of medieval maps , folk documents, field studies and geological surveys. .

 

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The research was led by Simon Haslett, Professor of Geophysics at Swansea University in Wales. The study indicates that the existence of the missing islands is considered plausible and provides an insight into the post-glacial coastal evolution of Cardigan Bay.

 

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“This study investigates historical origins along with geological evidence, depth, and proposes a model of post-glacial coastal evolution, providing an explanation for the ‘lost’ islands and a hypothetical framework for future research,” Professor Haslett and co-author David Willis Jesus, Professor of Celtic Studies at the University of Oxford, wrote in the study.

 

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“Literary evidence and folklore traditions have shown that Cardigan Bay associated with the disappeared Cantre’r Gwaelod lowland.” This study is the first to fully investigate the two mysterious islands. Hidden appears on the Gough Map, believed to date from the 13th or 14th century, making it the oldest surviving map of the British Isles.

 

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The land has an oval appearance, a few miles off the coast of Wales, 7 square miles to the south and twice the size to the north.

 

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The Roman cartographer Ptolemy, who lived about 2,000 years ago, seems to have placed this stretch of the Welsh coast about 8 miles deeper than it is today, which suggests that significant coastal erosion may have occurred in the following centuries.

 

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To prove that hypothesis, Professors Haslett and Willis assessed the impact of glaciation on the area during the last ice age. As these glacial structures receded over the past 10,000 years, they have left behind a low-lying landscape of soft deposits and sediments, created by geological forces such as rivers.

 

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Interestingly, the locations of the mysterious islands in the Gough Map line up with underwater “sarns”, which are piles of rocks and gravel shaped by these forces.

 

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“Measured, the two islands depicted on the Gough Map appear to be located roughly coincident with Sarn Cynfelin, between the mouths of the Ystwyth and Dyfi, and Sarn y Bwch, between the mouths of the Dyfi and Mawddach rivers. , suggesting that rough fragments of these ‘sarns’ may be anchored in islands,” the team announced.

 

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“It seems likely that the erosion of the two islands ended in the mid-16th century, as these islands do not appear on later maps,” the two researchers added.

 

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The team also note: “The story of Cantre’r Gwaelod may suggest that the lowlands, or at least parts of it, were still inhabited until the 5th-6th centuries. Some authors have considered the legend of Cantre’r Gwaelod to represent the folk memory of the scene sinking through rising sea levels in the millennia since the last ice age.
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The findings offer an interesting explanation for the strange islands depicted in the Gough Map, which will likely serve as evidence for the ancient Welsh land of Atlantis and possibly, serve as a lead for the search for other sunken lands.
Huy

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